Here’s a (very stupid) parody of the attitude as I imagine it from the most obstinate people with this view:

Well, my doctor says I need to take this medication, so that’s what I’m going to do. I don’t care what all those other people online are saying about their experiences with it. My doctor knows best, and I’m not going to listen to a bunch of anonymous strangers on the internet. They’re probably just making stuff up anyway.

Sure, I get that a lot of people had some nasty side effects or didn’t see any improvement, but my doctor assured me that won’t happen to me. He’s a professional, so I trust him completely. And I know he’s only trying to help, not line his own pockets or anything.

All those online forums and support groups are just a waste of time. What could a bunch of regular people possibly know that my highly educated, experienced doctor doesn’t? I’m going to take this medication exactly as prescribed and not ask any questions. My doctor is infallible, and I refuse to get a second opinion or consider any other options. Nope, I’m just going to blindly follow his advice and ignore everyone else. That’s the smart and responsible thing to do!

(Yes, this is extraordinary (and like I said stupid), and yes your doctor knows more than JoeRando420 telling you to buy homeopathic crystal suppositories. In fact I only have one user in mind writing this post, someone I forget who posted long ago about a condition I cannot remember. Hope they got better.)

Main point is: why not let a large number of people who heard about a condition from their own qualified doctors help you at least scribble down some questions to ask your own medical folks at your next appointment? (But please avoid those crystal suppositories.)


Edit: thanks everybody, read all your posts and they’re all great points! Glad I posted here. Thanks for reading something at least 80% dumb :)

  • slazer2au
    link
    fedilink
    English
    491 month ago

    Why trust the one professional who went through a decade of training and has my multi decade history over a group of people who spoke with their professional who went through a decade of training and doesn’t have my multi decade history?

    Well if I have a bad reaction to a medication, my doctor can work with manufacturers to also prescribe a medication to prevent the problem, or a more generic drug without those effects. where a group of random people will do the equivalent of throwing shit at the wall and hope it sticks.

  • FuglyDuck
    link
    fedilink
    English
    351 month ago

    Main point is: why not let a large number of people who heard about a condition from their own qualified doctors help you at least scribble down some questions to ask your own medical folks at your next appointment? (But please avoid those crystal suppositories.)

    Because:

    1. You have no way of verifying their anecdotes ever happened, that they were prescribed and on the medication
    2. no way of knowing other circumstances that affect medications, like drug interactions, or other unfortunate habits they might have had
    3. they have no knowledge of your underlying medical situation
    4. your doctor has 2 and 3, and should have access to studies in lieu of 1.
    5. Internet Randos are inherently untrustworthy.
    6. your doctor doesn’t get paid if you die.
  • @pavnilschanda@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    291 month ago

    Usually a (competent) doctor knows you physically through examinations. It’s very personalized so I can see the justification

  • @breadsmasher@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    241 month ago

    Option 1 - trust the medical professional sat in front of me, looking at my health data and making informed suggestions

    Option 2 - Trust the village idiots online who don’t trust doctors and would instead suggest many nonsense remedies

  • 🇰 🔵 🇱 🇦 🇳 🇦 🇰 ℹ️
    link
    fedilink
    English
    20
    edit-2
    1 month ago

    I have no way of knowing if they actually heard anything from their doctor, or if they are a doctor if they claim to be. If I think it’s concerning, I’ll talk to my doctor whom I can verify is actually who they say they are about it.

    It’s a matter of trust. I simply do not trust anyone I can’t actually talk face to face with.

    • lad
      link
      fedilink
      English
      71 month ago

      Albeit talking face to face is only a necessary condition, it’s not enough for trusting the person to advise you

    • @parodyOP
      link
      -11 month ago

      Good point.

      Would you take a risk when reading from someone who may be lying to you, to the point you would

      scribble down some questions to ask your own medical folks

      ?

      • @breadsmasher@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        English
        3
        edit-2
        1 month ago

        “Hello doctor! I read on a forum, filled with anonymous strangers, that if I dissolve all my medication in urine, it purifies it of all toxins! Can you vouch for that?”

        Is absolutely not a conversation I want to have with my doctor.

        • @parodyOP
          link
          128 days ago

          lol fair. Point taken!

          Not a counterpoint to you, but a shoutout to this one doc:

          You reminded me of a time 15 years ago when I very timidly mentioned to a doctor that I did do a very quick Google search, and the doctor quickly affirmed me: “hey, Google is a source!” or something like that. I further explained something like “OBVIOUSLY I came here to talk to a person with REAL medical experience, which is why I feel silly bringing it up, but …”

          I’m thankful I wasn’t searching for how to purify toxins with sterile beverages. Thank you :)

  • @tobogganablaze@lemmus.org
    link
    fedilink
    English
    191 month ago

    Getting a second opinion is a very common thing for people with serious conditions. Not really sure what you’re on about.

    • @parodyOP
      link
      -21 month ago

      Yeah it sure is, probably the top reason the parody was so dumb.

      In fact I only have one user in mind writing this post, someone I forget who posted long ago about a condition I cannot remember.

      I think they said they would block anyone who tried to offer any advice. But even they had probably had years and years of second and nth opinions.

      Come to think of it, I think I’m also responding to someone who demanded anyone seeking care “listen to your doctors!“ in a way that seem to preclude the fact that there is a safe way to use the fallible input of anonymous strangers as a tentative guiding factor.

  • Richard Horizon
    link
    fedilink
    English
    151 month ago

    Well, Yes. Your doctor does know better than the people sharing their experience online! Your own doctor knows how your body functions and will prescribe your medicine accordingly.

    They will also make sure the medicine they give you won’t harm you or your body.

  • @BreadOven@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    151 month ago

    While I don’t think you should base your decisions on opinions from random people on the Internet, I also don’t think you should blindly follow your doctor.

    I’ve seen many older doctors not keep up with more current treatments, or refuse to prescribe some things because their new/they don’t know about them.

    I’ve also seen far too many people get into med school, who I wouldn’t trust to put a bandaid on.

    That being said, your doctor should know what’s best for you (as others have mentioned). But there’s no problem with getting a second opinion/doing some research (legitimate research, not just stuff to prove your opinion).

    Tl;Dr: probably trust your doctor, but be open to other (valid) opinions.

    • @Thavron@lemmy.ca
      link
      fedilink
      41 month ago

      I’ve also seen far too many people get into med school, who I wouldn’t trust to put a bandaid on.

      Isn’t that why they’re going to med school? To learn (among other things) how to best put the bandaid on?

      • @BreadOven@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        21 month ago

        You are right. I should have specified seen them get in and through med school. But it’s mainly their reason for going into it ($$$), and sometimes lack of skill.

        I do trust most doctor’s opinions though.

  • @spittingimage@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    131 month ago

    One very good example of what you’re describing is the people who were insisting that vaccination gives you magnetic blood during the Covid outbreak. I’ve become very suspicious about the wisdom of crowds.

  • Rhynoplaz
    link
    fedilink
    121 month ago

    Since this is an experience you had with a single person, here’s my take on it: That interaction was one moment to you, but the other person had a lifetime to develop that mindset.

    I don’t know who you’re talking about, or what their ailment is, but they’ve probably been discussing it online for a while, and have probably gotten a LOT of medical recommendations. Some of them, great advice from people with experience, the rest are crystal suppositories.

    They probably just wanted to stick to the topic at hand or vent about an experience without having to sift through a bunch of people telling them about meds they’ve already researched or why they should go vegan.

  • @jet@hackertalks.com
    link
    fedilink
    English
    10
    edit-2
    1 month ago

    Because a lot of things online are blatantly false, you can’t tell if people are memeing, astroTurfing, have some weird agenda, or they all listen to one misinformed influencer.

    Your doctor, on the other hand has a medical duty to operate in your best interest, and to inform you of your best options.

    Are doctors always correct? Do they always have the time to understand your issue? Hell no. You’re still responsible for your own health care, but the doctor is supposed to be the dispassionate, invested, and rational consultant to help you on your journey

    So if somebody doesn’t have the time, energy, background, language skills, to actually look at research, it is reasonable for them to say I’m going to go with my doctor, and not other people. That’s fair, that’s your heuristic, nothing wrong with that as long as it’s done intelligently

    If you’re trying to convince somebody to go against their doctor’s advice, the burden is on you, to provide them overwhelming compelling evidence. The probabilities they’re operating under are that their doctor is correct and you are misinformed. The onus is on you to do all of the work, to prove your position. That’s a high barrier

  • PahassaPaikassa
    link
    fedilink
    91 month ago

    If your car is making a rumble noise, you take it to a mechanic who tells you its a failed wheel bearing. Do you then go and change the gearbox because you dont trust professionals?

    • @parodyOP
      link
      -11 month ago

      Haha might just ask “hey does the gearbox ever rumble like that?”, that’s all 🙂

      s/o to old school car forums who’ve guided my way when I’ve known zero, btw

      • PahassaPaikassa
        link
        fedilink
        81 month ago

        And then the mechanic will answer “yes. But its the wheel bearing thats making the noise.” Do you then go to the car forums and ask help with chaning the gearbox or do you trust the professional and change the wheel bearing?

  • lad
    link
    fedilink
    English
    81 month ago

    I’d say it’s a matter of what are the chances of bad advice. If something people on the internet are talking about is widely known, there would also be papers with research, and I’m better off reading that. If it’s a niche stuff, their talk on the internet doesn’t bear statistical significance anyway.

    Sure, there are scammers and incompetent doctors, but I would rather ask several people with a medical license, than several thousand laymen that think they are competent enough to give advices

    • @parodyOP
      link
      21 month ago

      Good laying out the cost-benefit here.

      there would also be papers with research, and I’m better off reading that.

      I had this in mind: that eventually somebody links some paper where they’ve read the abstract… then it’s sensible to read the whole thing and see if it’s worth discussing with someone qualified I suppose.

      Thanks 🙂

  • @Audacious@sh.itjust.works
    link
    fedilink
    41 month ago

    Doctors are people too and can make mistakes, but they are highly educated (hopefully through accreditation) and depending how long they have been in practice, experienced. That being said, online educational sources can help get you started if you suspect something is wrong, but don’t try to do a doctor’s work from online research. This includes asking Lemmy/reddit advice.

  • @rufus@discuss.tchncs.de
    link
    fedilink
    4
    edit-2
    1 month ago

    Yeah, the internet is an echo chamber. You get lots of bad advice here. And urban myths are regularly being upvoted to no end. Especially here on Lemmy.

    Usually a doctor should know things, they studied medicine for years.

    And there are people with certain attitudes… People who only respond well to arguments of authority… And people who have a different perspective on subjectivity/objectivity and the factual world. Lots of people just want to believe something. And they’ll search for any fake news supporting them or letting them believe whatever supports what they’re set on.

    I’d say if you’re intelligent and know how to do research, and have the time to do so, look up things and learn things. If you can’t do that: Stick with authority.

    And most importantly: Don’t ask on Lemmy or Reddit if you don’t want to talk to random people and listen to them.